Saturday, 28 January 2017

Gum Disease and Heart Disease Linked

Gum Disease Can Have a Serious Impact on Your Health

Recent medical research has indicated startling connections in the relationship between gum disease and more serious conditions such as stroke and heart disease. Since heart disease is usually fatal, it is clear that gum disease is a serious matter. The American Dental Association estimates that 80 percent of Americans have gum disease. Any other affliction at these levels, such tuberculosis or AIDS, would be considered an epidemic, and many dentists think it is just that. They also knew that gum disease would never be labeled epidemic because "no one ever dies from it." The worst is that you lose your teeth. Not pleasant – but certainly not life threatening. But that's all changed.

The American Academy of Periodontology reports: "Studies found periodontal infection may contribute to the development of heart disease, increase the risk of premature, underweight births, and pose a serious threat to people whose health is already compromised due to diabetes and respiratory diseases." Periodontal disease is characterized by bacterial infection of the gums. These bacteria can travel into the bloodstream – straight to the heart.


Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS 
208 N. Locust Street 
Reedsburg, WI 53959 
(608) 844-8023 
HatchDental.com

Sunday, 22 January 2017

What is a Cavity and What Causes Tooth Decay?

What to Know About Cavities and Tooth Decay

While cavities are very common dental problems in both children and adults, they can be prevented. Find out what you need to know to stay ahead of cavities. 

What Exactly Is a Cavity? 
It’s actually pretty simple. Decay (or softening of enamel) happens over time and the result is a cavity-a defect left in the tooth. Teeth are covered with a hard protective top layer called enamel. But once the enamel is weakened by acids produced by bacteria, a pit or cavity is formed in or on the tooth surface. 

What Causes Cavities and Tooth Decay?
While it’s ultimately acid-producing bacteria that leads to cavity formation, the most common cause of bacterial growth is inadequate daily brushing and flossing. Certain foods (carbs) and sugary drinks contribute to cavity formation-bacteria metabolize these carbohydrates and sugars and produce cavity-forming acids. 

To read the entire article visit OralB.com.

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS  
208 N. Locust Street  
Reedsburg, WI 53959  
(608) 844-8023  
HatchDental.com

Sunday, 15 January 2017

The Difference Between Plaque and Tartar

Lots of people ask their dental professional if there’s a difference between plaque and tartar-and it’s a great question. Both plaque and tartar buildup are common dental problems. Significant plaque buildup can result in tooth decay and gum disease. Tartar is calcified plaque. Arming yourself with the facts can help you be smarter about how you care for your teeth. 

The Facts About Plaque
Plaque is sticky, colorless film containing bacteria that builds up naturally on tooth surfaces and especially along the gum line within four to 12 hours after brushing. Sugars in food and drinks can combine with plaque bacteria to release acids. These acids attack tooth enamel and break it down, which can then create cavities. Plaque bacteria can also contribute to gum disease, like gingivitis. Regular brushing and flossing are your most effective tools in the fight against plaque. If it’s not removed daily, plaque eventually accumulates and hardens into tartar.  

To read the entire article visit OralB.com.

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS  
208 N. Locust Street  
Reedsburg, WI 53959  
(608) 844-8023  
HatchDental.com

Receding Gums

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about receding gums.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS  
208 N. Locust Street  
Reedsburg, WI 53959  
(608) 844-8023  
HatchDental.com

Wednesday, 11 January 2017

Sedation Dentistry with Nitrous Oxide

Nitrous Oxide Sedation

Breathe in, breathe out, and relax! Inhaled through a mask, nitrous oxide (laughing gas) produces a state of relaxation that permits local anesthetic to be delivered with little to no pain. Now, you can relax and not feel the needle. It also wears off quickly, allowing you to drive yourself home after your treatment.

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS 
208 N. Locust Street 
Reedsburg, WI 53959 
(608) 844-8023 
HatchDental.com

Sunday, 8 January 2017

What to Know About Gingivitis

What Is Gingivitis?
Gingivitis is an early stage of gum disease caused by the buildup of plaque bacteria on the tissues that surround the teeth. Plaque, a naturally occurring biofilm containing bacteria, can lead to gingivitis if not removed by daily brushing. 

Who Can Get Gingivitis?
Gingivitis is quite prevalent. But while almost 80% of adults will experience some symptoms of gingivitis, that doesn’t necessarily mean it’s inevitable. It’s important to note that occasionally there might be no noticeable pain or apparent signs, leaving people unaware that they have it. That’s another good reason to schedule regular checkups with your dental professional every six months so he or she can identify it and suggest treatment options.

Gingivitis Symptoms
Some symptoms of gingivitis include red, swollen, and bleeding gums. Chronic gingivitis can lead to periodontitis and chronic bad breath. If these symptoms persist, it's important to talk with your dental professional to determine the best treatment. In the meantime, learn what you can do to protect against gingivitis.

To read the entire article visit OralB.com.

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS  
208 N. Locust Street  
Reedsburg, WI 53959  
(608) 844-8023  
HatchDental.com

Dental Plaque

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about dental plaque.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS  
208 N. Locust Street  
Reedsburg, WI 53959  
(608) 844-8023  
HatchDental.com

Wednesday, 4 January 2017

Start Orthodontic Treatment Early

Starting Early, with Interceptive Orthodontics

Starting early is the key to better oral health and fewer orthodontic procedures. When your child is between the ages of 6 and 11, they're at a crucial stage in their dental development. They possess a mix of baby and permanent teeth in a mouth that is still pliable and easier to adjust. Dr. Hatch has the knowledge of craniofacial growth and development that allows him to identify and correct teeth and jaw disharmony early. By addressing crowding of the front teeth, cross-bites in the back teeth, and the mismatch of upper and lower jaws before children reach their teen years, corrections can be much less invasive and time-consuming. Sometimes orthodontics can be eliminated altogether!

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS 
208 N. Locust Street 
Reedsburg, WI 53959 
(608) 844-8023 
HatchDental.com

Sunday, 1 January 2017

Parts of the Tooth

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about about what makes up the tooth.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS  
208 N. Locust Street  
Reedsburg, WI 53959  
(608) 844-8023  
HatchDental.com