Monday, 24 February 2020

Dental Fluorosis: Causes, Treatments & Prevention

Below is an excerpt from an article found on crest.com

Dental flourosis (pronounced “floo-roh-sis”) is a common condition that can affect the appearance of children’s teeth due to the hypocalcification of tooth enamel. What is hypocalcification? It’s merely the scientific term for having less than normal amounts of calcification in the teeth, leading to spots of softer enamel and discoloration.
Most cases of fluorosis are mild and do not affect tooth function or cause pain, though in rare severe cases the enamel itself is affected with pitting and brown spots that aren’t as easily treated. Adults aren’t affected by fluorosis, but if you suspect that your child may have a severe form of fluorosis, see a dentist as soon as possible.
What causes Dental Fluorosis?
Sometimes called mottled enamel or enamel fluorosis, dental fluorosis occurs due to the sustained overconsumption of fluoride when the enamel layers of permanent teeth are being formed, even before they’re visible. This can happen before the age of 8 when permanent teeth come in, or around the ages of 1-2 when baby teeth come in.
Is fluoride bad? No, the CDC supports the use of fluoride as an important way to prevent tooth decay in children and adults. Fluoride is safe, but should only be consumed in proper amounts. That’s why it’s beneficial for parents to monitor their children’s brushing habits during the stages of tooth formation, to assure they aren’t accidentally ingesting large amounts of toothpaste or mouthwash.
Dental Fluorosis Symptoms
Mild forms of dental fluorosis can result in discoloration of teeth, usually appearing as white lace-like marks on the surface of teeth. More severe forms of dental fluorosis have larger areas of discoloration and, in rare severe cases, rough pits or pock-like marks on the enamel surface.
How to Prevent Dental Fluorosis
Infants can contract dental fluorosis due to the fluoride that is found in water (usually ingested when mixed with infant formula) or due to ingesting fluoride toothpaste. For kids under 2, breast feeding is a great alternative to formula and brushing can be done with a small, soft-bristled brush and plain water to limit fluoride intake.
For older children, remember to only apply a pea-sized amount of toothpaste and monitor their brushing to help them remember to spit toothpaste out after use.
Most cases of fluorosis are cosmetic and need no form of treatment. If the appearance of the teeth is seen as a problem, teeth whitening treatments can help to resolve visibly white spots. For more severe cases, consult your child’s dentist for the best treatment options.
To read the entire article visit crest.com

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS 
208 N. Locust Street 
Reedsburg, WI 53959 
(608) 844-8023 
HatchDental.com

Saturday, 15 February 2020

Water Flossing

Below is an excerpt from an article found on mouthhealthy.org

Water flossing is a way to clean between and around your teeth. A water flosser is a handheld device that sprays streams of water in steady pulses. The water, like traditional floss, removes food from between teeth. 
Water flossers that have earned the ADA Seal of Acceptance have been tested to be safe and effective at removing a sticky film called plaque, which puts you at a higher risk for cavities and gum disease. Water flossers with the ADA Seal can also help reduce gingivitis, the early form of gum disease, throughout your mouth and between your teeth. Get a list of all ADA-Accepted water flossers. 
Water flossers can be an option for people who have trouble flossing by hand. People who have had dental work that makes flossing difficult—like braces, or permanent or fixed bridges—also might try water flossers. 
Cleaning between your teeth once a day is an important part of your dental hygiene routine. You should also brush your teeth twice a day for two minutes and see your dentist regularly.
To read the entire article visit mouthhealthy.org

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS 
208 N. Locust Street 
Reedsburg, WI 53959 
(608) 844-8023 
HatchDental.com

Thursday, 6 February 2020

Dental Anesthesia Side Effects And Causes For Treatment

Below is an excerpt from an article found on colgate.com

Medical procedures are sometimes necessary to maintain your health, including oral health. Anesthesia is inherent to more involved procedures, whether it's knee surgery or filling an advanced cavity, and when properly administered, it isn't a point of concern. But some people do suffer from dental anesthesia side effects. Here's a look into anesthesia and why some patients don't respond as well to it.
Anesthesia Types
There are two types of anesthesia: local and general. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) defines local anesthesia as "the temporary loss of sensation including pain in one part of the body produced by a topically-applied or injected agent without depressing the level of consciousness." In effect, your dentist simply desensitizes a portion of your mouth by injecting medicine into the gum or inner cheek; you can stay awake for this process. General anesthesia, according to Aetna, sedates you for an extended period of time, and an air tube allows you to breathe while you're asleep.
Although the term can be misleading, general anesthesia has a much more specific role to your comfort during a procedure, and is administered by a trained professional such as an oral-maxillofacial surgeon or medical anesthesiologist. Local (or regional) anesthesia is used for much simpler types of treatment, wherein your needs are minor enough that your bodily state can remain the same.
Procedures Requiring Anesthesia
Unfortunately, not all trips to the dentist are as easy as a routine cleaning so check before booking your next appointment. Tooth extraction is one of the most common processes necessitating anesthesia. When a tooth that has become decayed needs to be removed, the doctor anesthetizes the area of your mouth surrounding that tooth. Wisdom teeth are another common cause for anesthezed removal, usually due to impaction or simply not having enough room to erupt.
Although root canals have become much easier over the years, they are another example of when an anesthesia is necessary. When a tooth's pulp becomes damaged or diseased, the part of the tooth that houses the pulp needs to be removed and sealed, thereby saving the tooth from extraction. Probably the most common need for anesthesia, however, is in the filling of a cavity. A filling is required when a small section of your tooth succumbs to decay, creating a small area that the dentist will remove the decay and fill the cavity.
Dental Anesthesia Side Effects
Side effects from a local anesthesia are few and far between, but they do occasionally arise. Numbness felt beyond the affected part of the mouth is a very common one. Following a local injection to your gums, for example, the medicine can cause your eyelid or cheek muscles to droop. After the anesthesia wears off, this numbness dissipates. Here are a few more:
  • Unable to blink – If you can't blink one of your eyes, your dentist can tape it shut until the numbness ceases so that it doesn't dry out.
  • Hematoma – Described as a blood-filled swelling, this can happen if the needle strikes a blood vessel upon injection.
  • Racing heart beat – The vasoconstrictor drug in the anesthesia can increase your heart beat for a minute or two. Be sure to mention this to your doctor if you notice it.
  • Nerve damage – If the needle directly hits a nerve, the result can be numbness and pain that lasts for weeks or months. Nerve damage is very rare in a regional injection, according to the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA).
The best way to avoid any dental anesthesia side effects is to lower your risk of issues that warrant a desensitizing solution. A good way to achieve that goal is by using a toothpaste such as Colgate TotalSF Advanced Deep Clean. Brushing, flossing and a healthy diet are all keys to keeping a healthy mouth. Of course, make sure you schedule your regular dental checkup, too.
To read the entire article visit colgate.com
Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS 
208 N. Locust Street 
Reedsburg, WI 53959 
(608) 844-8023 
HatchDental.com

Thursday, 30 January 2020

Great Ways to Improve Your Smile # 6

Implants
Dental implants are a popular and effective way to replace missing teeth. Surgically placed in the upper or lower jaw, they function as a sturdy anchor for replacement teeth. Made of titanium and other materials, implants are designed to hold restorations like crowns or bridges blend in with your other teeth, and are a long-term option for restoring your smile. 

The above article is from: MouthHealthy.org

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS 
208 N. Locust Street 
Reedsburg, WI 53959 
(608) 844-8023 
HatchDental.com

Friday, 24 January 2020

New Year, Healthier Mouth

Below is an excerpt from an article found on mouthhealthy.org


What does ringing in the new year have to do with being mouth healthy? 
More than you may think. Did you know that you should replace your toothbrush every three to four months? Bristles that become frayed and worn are less effective at cleaning your teeth. That means, celebrating the new year with a brand new toothbrush is actually smart dental hygiene.


Here are MouthHealthy resolutions:

  • Start brushing 2min2x. Always brush twice a day for two minutes for healthier teeth, good breath, fewer cavities, and to avoid painful dental problems. 
  • Floss daily. Flossing is part of being mouth healthy.
  • Chew sugarless gum. Chewing sugarless gum for 20 minutes following meals can help prevent tooth decay.
  • Eat a healthy diet. Eat a balanced diet and limit between-meal snacks.
  • Drink fluoridated water. Fluoride helps prevent cavities by making teeth more resistant to the acid attacks that cause cavities.
  • See your dentist. Regular dental visits will help you be Mouth Healthy for Life.  
To read the entire article visit mouthhealthy.org

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS 
208 N. Locust Street 
Reedsburg, WI 53959 
(608) 844-8023 
HatchDental.com

Tuesday, 21 January 2020

Great Ways to Improve Your Smile # 5

Braces
While orthodontic work that begins while a child is growing helps produce optimal results, that doesn’t mean that adults can’t have braces. Thanks to advances in orthodontic treatments, metal brackets are not your only option. Removable aligners, or invisible braces,î or clear plastic brackets can all be used to straighten crooked or crowded teeth.

The above article is from: MouthHealthy.org

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS 
208 N. Locust Street 
Reedsburg, WI 53959 
(608) 844-8023 
HatchDental.com

Friday, 17 January 2020

Great Ways to Improve Your Smile # 4

Bonding
Not happy with the way your teeth look? Bonding may be the answer. For some, it can help restore the natural look of your teeth. Bonding is a process where the dentist attaches or “bonds” materials directly to your tooth. Your natural tooth enamel and dentin are fused together with bonding materials such as porcelain and resins to create a strong structure that looks great.

The above article is from: MouthHealthy.org

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS 
208 N. Locust Street 
Reedsburg, WI 53959 
(608) 844-8023 
HatchDental.com