Sunday, 31 December 2017

Understanding Your Dental Plan

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about understanding your dental plan.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS 
208 N. Locust Street 
Reedsburg, WI 53959 
(608) 844-8023 
HatchDental.com

Friday, 22 December 2017

Oral Care During the Holidays: Sugar-Free Countdown to Christmas

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was written by Sher Warkentin

Maintaining good oral care during the holidays can be tough with the bombardment of sugary sweets all season. Counting down to Christmas with an advent calendar is a fun activity for your kids, but if they are filled with chocolate and sweets, it won't be so great for their teeth. Check out these simple sugar-free ideas to fill your countdown instead.

Holiday Activity Fun
Fill your child's countdown with special moments that they will cherish all year round. For each day of the month come up with a fun holiday activity that you can do together as a family. Some ideas include: watching a holiday movie, going ice skating, building a snowman and looking at Christmas lights. Write down the activity on a slip of paper and tuck one note into each day of your advent calendar.

A Puzzling Treat
Give your child a fun challenge with a customized puzzle. Draw a picture or write a special message on a blank puzzle. Break the pieces apart and place one puzzle piece in each day of your advent calendar. Every day your child can add the pieces together until they have a completed puzzle revealing a special holiday message or fun activity to do together.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • Sugar-Free Trinkets
  • Story-A-Day

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS 
208 N. Locust Street 
Reedsburg, WI 53959 
(608) 844-8023 
HatchDental.com

Friday, 15 December 2017

Tobacco Risks on Oral Health

Learn what the American Dental Association has to say about tobacco risks on oral health.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS 
208 N. Locust Street 
Reedsburg, WI 53959 
(608) 844-8023 
HatchDental.com

Kids' Healthy Teeth During the Holidays

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was written by Elizabeth SanFilippo

Chances are good that visions of cookies, desserts and candy canes may be dancing in your children's heads this holiday season. While you will do what you can to limit their intake of these sugary treats, your kids will probably be eating their fair share of sugar at your family holiday parties. Despite their consumption of sugar, there are ways to keep your kids' healthy teeth and gums in shape and to minimize damage to their dental health.

Why Is Sugar Bad for Dental Health?
Whether your kids are eating chocolate cake, sugar cookies or peppermint candy, they are ingesting sugar. According to the American Dental Association (ADA), naturally occurring bacteria in the mouth feed on this sugar, and the byproduct is acid. This acid can eat away at tooth enamel, which can lead to tooth decay and cavities. The more time teeth spend exposed to sugar, the higher the risk that your children will face dental health problems. Hard candies, and sticky candies such as taffy and caramel, can be worse for teeth than other treats such as cake and cookies.

Brush after Eating a Sugary Treat
In general, the ADA recommends that everyone brush their teeth and gums at least twice a day for at least two minutes each time. Flossing should also be done at least once a day. During the holidays, encourage your kids to brush and floss even more than this, particularly right after they finish dessert. If a toothbrush is not handy, the next best thing to do is rinse. Encourage your kids to rinse their mouths with water - not soda or even sparkling grape juice - which will help wash away sugar, acids and any other food that may be stuck to their teeth.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • Limit Sugar Time
  • Make Dessert a Part of the Meal
  • Make Toothbrushing Fun
  • Schedule a Dentist Visit

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS 
208 N. Locust Street 
Reedsburg, WI 53959 
(608) 844-8023 
HatchDental.com

Friday, 8 December 2017

Regular Dental Check-Ups

Learn what the American Dental Association has to say about regular dental check-ups.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS 
208 N. Locust Street 
Reedsburg, WI 53959 
(608) 844-8023 
HatchDental.com

Surprisingly Simple Food Tips for Healthy Teeth

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was written by Donna Pleis

You already know the value of regular tooth brushing and flossing to the prevention of tooth decay and gum disease, but what you eat can help too. Here are a few tips for healthy teeth involving simple foods that may be more helpful to your dental health than you thought they were.

An Element of Strength
The mineral, fluoride, plays an important role in building strong teeth and bones, and ultimately protecting your teeth against tooth decay. This is why fluoride has been included in toothpastes like Colgate Cavity Protection and many community water supplies. But did you know it's also found naturally in many foods? Any fluoride you ingest is absorbed and distributed throughout the body, according to the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD), though most of it deposited into your bones and teeth.

So, to give you and your family's teeth an extra bit of strength now and then, serve up foods with naturally high concentrations of fluoride. Most seafood is a good source of this because oceans are full of natural sodium fluoride. According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), tea and gelatin contain fluoride as well. Carrots, beets, canned pork and beans also have significant amounts (who would've thought?), as well as infant formula, juices, canned tomato products and cheeses. And if you like baked potatoes, don't peel off the skin; that's where most of the fluoride is found. You can identify more fluoride-rich foods at the USDA National Nutrient Database.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • 'Moo're Dairy Please
  • Swish and Swallow
  • Candy and Chewing Gum
  • Nature's Toothbrush

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS 
208 N. Locust Street 
Reedsburg, WI 53959 
(608) 844-8023 
HatchDental.com

Friday, 1 December 2017

After-Hours Emergency Dentistry

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to about after-hours emergency dentistry.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS 
208 N. Locust Street 
Reedsburg, WI 53959 
(608) 844-8023 
HatchDental.com

Tuesday, 21 November 2017

Diabetes and Your Dental Health # 3

November is Diabetes Awareness Month. This month we are featuring information found on MouthHealthy.org that discuss how diabetes can affect  your dental health. Below is one way that diabetes can affect your oral health.

Slow Healing 












Have you ever noticed a cold sore or a cut in your mouth that doesn’t quite seem to go away? This can be another way that diabetes may affect your mouth. Poor control of blood sugar can keep injuries from healing quickly and properly. If you have something in your mouth that you feel isn’t healing as it should, see your dentist.

To read all '5 Ways Diabetes Can Affect Your Mouth' visit MouthHealthy.org.

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS 
208 N. Locust Street 
Reedsburg, WI 53959 
(608) 844-8023 
HatchDental.com

Tuesday, 14 November 2017

Diabetes and Your Dental Health # 2

November is Diabetes Awareness Month. This month we are featuring information found on MouthHealthy.org that discuss how diabetes can affect  your dental health. Below are two ways that diabetes can affect your oral health.

Change in Taste 












Your favorite flavors might not taste as rich as your remember if you have diabetes. It can be disappointing, but take the opportunity to experiment with different tastes, textures and spices to your favorite foods. Just take care not to add too much sugar to your food in an effort to add flavor. Not only can this affect the quality of your diet, it can also lead to more cavities. If you have a persistent bad taste in your mouth, see your dentist or doctor.

Infections 












Diabetes affects your immune system, leaving you more vulnerable to infection. One common among people with diabetes is a yeast infection called oral thrush (candidiasis). The yeast thrive on the higher amount of sugar found in your saliva, and it looks like a white layer coating your tongue and the insides of your cheeks. Thrush is more common in people who wear dentures and can often leave a bad taste in your mouth. See your dentist if you think you have thrush or any other mouth infection.

To read all '5 Ways Diabetes Can Affect Your Mouth' visit MouthHealthy.org.

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS 
208 N. Locust Street 
Reedsburg, WI 53959 
(608) 844-8023 
HatchDental.com

Tuesday, 7 November 2017

Diabetes and Your Dental Health # 1

November is Diabetes Awareness Month. This month we are featuring information found on MouthHealthy.org that discuss how diabetes can affect  your dental health. Below are two ways that diabetes can affect your oral health.

Gum Disease 












Notice some bleeding when you brush or floss? That may be an early sign of gum disease. If it becomes more severe, the bone that supports your teeth can break down, leading to tooth loss. Early gum disease can be reversed with proper brushing, flossing and diet. Research has shown gum disease can worsen if your blood sugar is not under control, so do your best to keep it in check.

Dry Mouth 












Studies have found people with diabetes have less saliva, so you might find yourself feeling parched or extra thirsty. (Medications and higher blood sugar levels are also causes.) Fight dry mouth by drinking water. You can also chew sugarless gum and eat healthy, crunchy foods to get saliva flowing. This is especially important because extra sugar in your saliva, combined with less saliva to wash away leftover food, can lead to cavities.

To read all '5 Ways Diabetes Can Affect Your Mouth' visit MouthHealthy.org.

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS 
208 N. Locust Street 
Reedsburg, WI 53959 
(608) 844-8023 
HatchDental.com

Sunday, 16 July 2017

Ask the Dentist by the ADA: 'My Child Lost a Tooth! Now What?'

The American Dental Association has created informative videos called Ask the Dentist. Here is their video on: 'My Child Lost a Tooth! Now What?'


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS 
208 N. Locust Street 
Reedsburg, WI 53959 
(608) 844-8023 
HatchDental.com

Wednesday, 12 July 2017

Fight Tooth Decay with Xylitol

How Does Xylitol Help Reduce Cavities?

Xylitol is a natural substance produced in the fibrous portions of fruits, berries, mushrooms, and other vegetables. Even your body generates 5 to 10 grams of xylitol daily. This sweetener is highly effective in reducing the tooth decay caused by eating foods high in sugars and starches. Over 25 years of clinical testing bears out this claim. It has been endorsed by dental associations worldwide, including in Sweden, Norway, England, Estonia, and many others. Available in a number of forms, xylitol not only fights tooth decay but has proven beneficial to those inflicted with allergies and other respiratory problems. We offer and encourage our patients to use xylitol products. Ask us about it today!

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS
208 N. Locust Street
Reedsburg, WI 53959
(608) 844-8023
HatchDental.com

Sunday, 9 July 2017

Ask the Dentist by the ADA: 'What Kind of Toothpaste Should I Use?'

The American Dental Association has created informative videos called Ask the Dentist. Here is their video on: 'What Kind of Toothpaste Should I Use?'


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS 
208 N. Locust Street 
Reedsburg, WI 53959 
(608) 844-8023 
HatchDental.com

Wednesday, 5 July 2017

Clear Correct Orthodontic Aligners

A Great Confidence Booster

The best part of using ClearCorrect is that no one can tell you're in the process of straightening your teeth. That's because the aligners are so clear, it renders them practically invisible. People would have to know the aligners are there, or look extremely closely, to detect them. This allows you to have much more confidence in your smile while you are in active treatment.

Comfort is another benefit of ClearCorrect. The aligners are all in one piece, with no metal or wires to be checked and adjusted, so you get to spend less time in the dentist's chair. The lack of braces, wires, or headgear eliminates any temporary mouth irritation. The convenience factor tops it all off. You wear the aligners all day and even while you sleep, but you can remove them very easily to eat meals and brush your teeth. There are no restrictions on what you eat or drink while in treatment, and keeping your teeth clean and free of plaque is just as easy, because there are no braces to get in the way of brushing and flossing.

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS
208 N. Locust Street
Reedsburg, WI 53959
(608) 844-8023
HatchDental.com

Sunday, 2 July 2017

Ask the Dentist by the ADA: 'My Child Has a Toothache. Should I Call the Dentist?'

The American Dental Association has created informative videos called Ask the Dentist. Here is their video on: 'My Child Has a Toothache. Should I Call the Dentist?'


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS 
208 N. Locust Street 
Reedsburg, WI 53959 
(608) 844-8023 
HatchDental.com

Wednesday, 28 June 2017

Dental Bridges

An Affordable Alternative for Multiple Missing Teeth

Gaps caused by missing teeth can create a multitude of issues within your mouth. You may experience a shift in your jaw alignment, an inability to eat certain foods, and undue stress on your other teeth. A bridge may be the right solution for filling the gap. At Hatch Dental, our bridges are custom created with the same advanced materials as our crowns. We can span the gap and secure both sides of the bridge with crowns, producing a return to chewing function, comfort, and a full smile.

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS
208 N. Locust Street
Reedsburg, WI 53959
(608) 844-8023
HatchDental.com

Thursday, 22 June 2017

Potential Causes of Toothaches: It's Not Always a Cavity

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was written by Wendy J. Woudstra

No matter how conscientious you are about your oral care routine, at some point in your life you will probably experience the discomfort of a toothache. Though a cavity is the most likely culprit, it is only one of several possible causes of toothaches.

Tooth Sensitivity
If you are experiencing sharp pains when eating or drinking hot or cold foods, it could mean you have a cavity. It may also be a sign that you may have sensitive teeth, either from receding gums or from a thinning of your tooth enamel. While you are waiting for a dental appointment to confirm the cause of your sensitive teeth, using a soft-bristled toothbrush and a toothpaste designed for sensitive teeth may help ease the symptoms.

Some Toothaches Are More Severe
If the pain you are experiencing is a sharp, stabbing pain when you bite down on your food, the cause of your toothache could be a cavity or a cracked tooth. If it's a throbbing, incessant pain, on the other hand, you may have an abscessed tooth or an infection that should be taken care of as quickly as possible.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • It Might Not Even Be Your Teeth
  • See Your Dentist to Be Sure

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS 
208 N. Locust Street 
Reedsburg, WI 53959 
(608) 844-8023 
HatchDental.com

Thursday, 15 June 2017

Dealing With Dry Mouth

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was written by the ADA

A healthy adult produces about three pints of saliva each day. It's not the kind of thing you would give thought to very often, but that saliva plays a very important role in maintaining your health.

Saliva serves many purposes. It contains enzymes that aid in digestion. Saliva makes it easier to talk, a fact recognized by those who experience stage fright and the associated dry mouth while giving a presentation. 

Saliva also helps prevent tooth decay by washing away food and debris from the teeth and gums. It neutralizes damaging acids, enhances the ability to taste food and makes it easier to swallow. Minerals found in saliva also help repair microscopic tooth decay. 

Everyone, at some time or another, experiences dry mouth, also called "xerostomia." It can happen when you are nervous, upset or under stress or as a result of medication you take or other medical therapies. If dry mouth happens all or most of the time, however, it can be uncomfortable - and it can have serious consequences for your oral health.

Drying irritates the soft tissues in the mouth, which can make them inflamed and more susceptible to infection. Without the cleansing effects of saliva, tooth decay and other oral health problems become much more common. 

Regular dental checkups are important. At each appointment, report any medications you are taking and other information about your health. An updated health history can help identify a cause for mouth dryness. 

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS 
208 N. Locust Street 
Reedsburg, WI 53959 
(608) 844-8023 
HatchDental.com

Ask the Dentist by the ADA: 'How Can I Help My Elderly Parent Brush Her Teeth?'

The American Dental Association has created informative videos called Ask the Dentist. Here is their video on: 'How Can I Help My Elderly Parent Brush Her Teeth?'


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS 
208 N. Locust Street 
Reedsburg, WI 53959 
(608) 844-8023 
HatchDental.com

Sunday, 11 June 2017

Bad Breath Linked to Gum Disease

Do You Suffer from Bad Breath?

Coffee breath is one thing. Chronic bad breath is another. It can not only destroy your social life, it's often a sign of more dangerous health problems. Often, chronic bad breath is a symptom of gum disease or other serious mouth infections. Improvements in diagnosis and treatment of bad breath have prompted Dr. Hatch to add a Fresh Breath Center to our practice. Fresh breath can be yours again!

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS
208 N. Locust Street
Reedsburg, WI 53959
(608) 844-8023
HatchDental.com

Thursday, 8 June 2017

All About Cavities

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was Reviewed by the Faculty of Columbia University College of Dental Medicine

What's in Your Mouth? 
To understand what happens when your teeth decay, it's helpful to know what's in your mouth naturally. Here are a few of the elements: 

  • Saliva - Your mouth and teeth are constantly bathed in saliva. We never give much thought to our spit, but this fluid is remarkable for what it does to help protect our oral health. Saliva keeps teeth and other parts of your mouth moist and washes away bits of food. Saliva contains minerals that strengthen teeth. It includes buffering agents. They reduce the levels of acid that can decay teeth. Saliva also protects against some viruses and bacteria. 
  • Plaque - Plaque is a soft, gooey substance that sticks to the teeth a bit like jam sticks to a spoon. Like the slime that clings to the bottom of a swimming pool, plaque is a type of biofilm. It contains large numbers of closely packed bacteria, components taken from saliva, and bits of food. Also in the mix are bacterial byproducts and white blood cells. Plaque grows when bacteria attach to the tooth and begin to multiply. Plaque starts forming right after a tooth is cleaned. Within an hour, there's enough to measure. As time goes on, the plaque thickens. Within two to six hours, the plaque teems with bacteria that can cause cavities and periodontal (gum) disease. 
  • Calculus - If left alone long enough, plaque absorbs minerals from saliva. These minerals form crystals and harden into calculus. Then new plaque forms on top of existing calculus. This new layer can also become hard. 
  • Bacteria - We have many types of bacteria in our mouths. Some bacteria are good; they help control destructive bacteria. When it comes to decay, Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli are the bacteria that cause the most damage to teeth. 

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • How Your Teeth Decay
  • Types of Decay
  • Preventing Cavities

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS 
208 N. Locust Street 
Reedsburg, WI 53959 
(608) 844-8023 
HatchDental.com

Ask the Dentist by the ADA: 'How Can I Get My Child to Brush Her Teeth?'

The American Dental Association has created informative videos called Ask the Dentist. Here is their video on: 'How Can I Get My Child to Brush Her Teeth?'


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS 
208 N. Locust Street 
Reedsburg, WI 53959 
(608) 844-8023 
HatchDental.com

Sunday, 4 June 2017

Custom Dental Mouthguards

Worried About Knocking Out a Tooth?

If you play an active sport, then you realize that a portion of your power and strength comes from your ability to breathe properly. A properly fitted sportsguard aligns your mouth and improves your air capacity during training or competition. Additionally, the strenuous and competitive nature of many sports increases your risk of accidently damaging a tooth. Within the United States an estimated 5 million teeth are knocked out or damaged every year. The one-size-fits-all mouthguards that are found in stores rarely fit anyone correctly. Your best option is a specially designed guard that fits your mouth, protects well, and can be worn for any sport. We offer custom mouthguards you can really bite into and recommend them for a multitude of sports from handball to skydiving – from rugby to weightlifting.

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS
208 N. Locust Street
Reedsburg, WI 53959
(608) 844-8023
HatchDental.com


Thursday, 1 June 2017

Ask the Dentist by the ADA: 'How Should I Clean and Store My Toothbrush?'

The American Dental Association has created informative videos called Ask the Dentist. Here is their video on: 'How Should I Clean and Store My Toothbrush?'


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS 
208 N. Locust Street 
Reedsburg, WI 53959 
(608) 844-8023 
HatchDental.com

Sunday, 28 May 2017

Dental Crowns

Restore Your Damaged Teeth

Do you have a tooth in need of repair beyond the scope of a simple filling? We use the best-quality material available to fabricate a crown that looks so natural you won't be able to distinguish it from a real tooth. Crowns can also be used to restore worn-down teeth that no longer function as intended. In either case, a crown can both save and add strength to your worn or damaged teeth.

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS
208 N. Locust Street
Reedsburg, WI 53959
(608) 844-8023
HatchDental.com

Tuesday, 23 May 2017

3 Things All Athletes Should Do for Their Teeth

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org

Dentist Dr. Thomas Long has seen firsthand what can happen when “the puck stops here.” In addition to seeing everyday athletes in his private practice, Dr. Long (a former college hockey player himself) is the team dentist for the National Hockey League’s Carolina Hurricanes.

No matter what sport or skill level, Dr. Long says athletes need to take care of their teeth both on and off the field. “Most athletes are careful about what they eat and their workout routine. Part of that routine should include taking care of your mouth and teeth every single day,” he says. "It would be a shame to miss practice or a game because you are in the dentist's office receiving treatment or recovering from a dental surgical procedure.”

Here, Dr. Long shares his playbook for a healthy mouth. 

  • Make a Mouthguard Part of Your Uniform
  • Sideline Sugary Sports Drinks
  • Brush, Floss, Rinse, Repeat

To read the entire article, including more detailed information on the three steps listed in Dr. Long's playbook for a health mouth, please visit MouthHealthy.org.

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS 
208 N. Locust Street 
Reedsburg, WI 53959 
(608) 844-8023 
HatchDental.com

Tuesday, 16 May 2017

Natural Teeth Whitening: Fact vs. Fiction

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org

When it comes to teeth whitening, you may see many different methods featured online and in magazines-from oil pulling to charcoal, and even turmeric. It's no surprise that DIY whitening is top of mind, either. When the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry asked people what they’d most like to improve their smile, the most common response was whiter teeth. 
Healthy smiles come in many shades, though it's tempting to think ingredients in our own kitchens could hold the key to a brighter smile. Still, just because a method is natural doesn’t mean it’s healthy. In fact, DIY whitening can do more harm than good to your teeth. Here’s how:  

Fruits











Fiction:
The approach maintains you can make your teeth whiter and brighter household staples that are naturally acidic (like lemons, oranges, apple cider vinegar), contain digestive enzymes (such as pineapple or mango) and something that is abrasive (like baking soda).
Fact: 
When eaten as usual, fruit is a great choice. However, fruit and vinegar contain acid, and you put your pearly whites at risk when you prolong their contact with your teeth or use them to scrub your teeth because acid can wear away your enamel. Enamel is the thin outer coating of your teeth that protects you from tooth sensitivity and cavities. 

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

The remainder of the article reveals fact vs. fiction for the following:

  • Scrubs
  • Spices and Oils
  • Still Interested in Whitening?

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS 
208 N. Locust Street 
Reedsburg, WI 53959 
(608) 844-8023 
HatchDental.com

Ask the Dentist by the ADA: 'Do Bad Teeth Run In the Family?'

The American Dental Association has created informative videos called Ask the Dentist. Here is their video on: 'Do Bad Teeth Run In the Family?'


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS 
208 N. Locust Street 
Reedsburg, WI 53959 
(608) 844-8023 
HatchDental.com

Friday, 12 May 2017

Clear-Correct Aligners

ClearCorrect™ – The Invisible Alternative

Invisible aligners are the innovative solution to straighter teeth! Corrections to overcrowding, wide spaces, overbite, underbite, or crossbite can occur in 9 – 15 months. Best of all, they are nearly undetectable to the outside world! ClearCorrect™ utilizes 3-D computer-imaging technology to prepare your treatment plan from the current position of your teeth to your ultimate smile.

Similar to teeth-whitening trays, clear thermoplastic aligners are custom made to fit your teeth. Starting with the first set of aligners, they exert enough gentle force to begin moving your teeth into the correct position. Every two weeks, you replace the current set of aligners with new ones, progressing through the treatment for about a year. Evaluations are done in our office at four- to eight-week intervals. Total treatment time is based on individual needs.

ClearCorrect aligners are comfortable and produce almost no mouth irritation. There are no metal or wires to be checked and adjusted, so you get to spend less time in the dentist's chair. You can eat and drink without restriction while in treatment. The aligners are removable for eating, brushing, and flossing.

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS
208 N. Locust Street
Reedsburg, WI 53959
(608) 844-8023
HatchDental.com

Tuesday, 9 May 2017

8 Non-Dairy, Calcium-Rich Foods for Your Teeth

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org 

Caring for your teeth means more than brushing and cleaning between them every day. It also means paying attention to the foods you eat. 

One of the most important nutrients for healthy teeth is calcium. Calcium strengthens the hard outer shell of your tooth called enamel, which is your teeth’s defense against erosion and cavities. To protect your teeth and get the 1,000-2,000 mg daily recommended amount of calcium, many people turn to dairy products like milk, cheese and yogurt. 

If you’re lactose intolerant or need to limit dairy, there are a number of foods that can still give you the calcium you need. Calcium is found naturally in some foods, while others - such as juice, tofu and even waffles - are now fortified with added calcium. 

Here are some non-dairy options from the USDA Food Composition Database to help keep your body and smile strong.

Orange Juice with Added Calcium











Oranges naturally have a bit of calcium, but many varieties of orange juice (already a top source of vitamin C) now come fortified with calcium. For example, frozen orange juice from concentrate with added calcium contains 1514 mg of calcium per cup. That’s your daily recommendation in just one glass! Juice, however, can be high in sugar, so drink it in moderation.  If your child drinks juice, make sure to serve the recommended, age-appropriate limits.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

The remainder of the article highlights 7 over non-dairy, calcium-rich foods that are good for your teeth:

  • Whey Powder
  • Tofu with Added Calcium
  • Canned Fish
  • Beans
  • Almonds
  • Leafy Green Vegetables
  • Soymilk

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS 
208 N. Locust Street 
Reedsburg, WI 53959 
(608) 844-8023 
HatchDental.com

Ask the Dentist by the ADA: 'Does Your Dentist Know If You Lie About Brushing and Flossing?'

'Does Your Dentist Know If You Lie About Brushing and Flossing? '


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Hatch Dental  
Thomas Hatch, DDS 
208 N. Locust Street 
Reedsburg, WI 53959 
(608) 844-8023 
HatchDental.com